Archives by Month

May 2014

Whose Loan Is It Anyway?

Regardless of who is going to be paying back the loan, it’s worth looking at both parent and student loans when you consider borrowing for college. Each has its pros and cons and depending on your situation, one may be better than the other. In general, interest paid on student loan debt—federal or private loans—is tax-deductible to the named borrower,…

Key Findings About Student Debt

According to a recent report from the Pew Research Center, “Student debt is the only kind of household debt that continued to rise through the Great Recession, eclipsing credit card debt to become the second largest type of debt owed by American households, after mortgages. According to a new Pew Research report, a record 37% of young households had outstanding student…

“Is It Still Worth Going to College?”

Fed economists Mary Daly and Leila Bengali explore this question in a new research paper. Their conclusion? Based on lifetime earnings, yes: “for the average student, tuition costs for the majority of college education opportunities in the United States can be recouped by age 40, after which college graduates continue to earn a return on their investment in the form…

Federal Student Loans

The most common federal student loans are Stafford and PLUS loans. The biggest distinction between the two is that, for undergraduates, Stafford loans are loans made to students and PLUS loans are loans made to parents. Regardless of who’s going to be repaying the loan, it’s worth looking at both to determine which is a better deal. With a Stafford…