Category Archives: Uncategorized

Drop Off #1 in the Books

Well, we did it—Alex is off to college! He moved into his dorm on Thursday and classes started yesterday. How did it go, you ask?

It was a whirlwind—enough that I *almost* didn’t have time to get sad. There were the final attempts to bubble-wrap him before he left (“Do you want knee pads for your skateboard?”), the parting shots of hard-earned knowledge (“No one empties the lint Continue reading Drop Off #1 in the Books

Hitting Pause

My daughter just forwarded me an email—appending exclamation points and smiley faces—from one of the schools she applied to, saying they’ll be sending out acceptances between March 1 and March 15. She’s nervous about acceptances but excited for her next steps so she was thrilled to learn she’ll get at least one answer really soon. For me, a moment of relief that the answers are coming was quickly replaced by an urgent desire to hit the Pause button on life. Yes, I’m excited for her and yes, I’m confident that she’ll have some good choices. But I also feel like we only have a few more days in the world of Continue reading Hitting Pause

College Visits Whys & Hows

I received so many questions and comments on my last article about college visits that I wanted to follow up on a couple of items: Why should you make visits a priority and how can you visit a number of schools. The first point I’d make is this: It doesn’t matter which schools you visit. You will learn something that will inform your college selection process Continue reading College Visits Whys & Hows

Sales of Student Personal Data

Ever wonder why your student is bombarded with not just college information but invitations to high-priced “leadership” camps or “honor societies” or test prep and college counseling services? This article explains what the College Board, the ACT, and other organizations– including colleges who buy the data– do with your student’s info if they complete the voluntary surveys.

As the article points out, these surveys are voluntary, but that point may be lost on 16-year-old first-time test takers who are focused on the exams.

A little off topic today

Lately it feels like the Interwebs are loaded with stories about “perfect” kids—4.3+ GPAs, 1400+ SATs—not getting into their first choice schools. Kids are being told that getting into a “good college” is the “best path” to a “good life” so they work hard, hit all the marks they’re supposed to, and then get shut down in the college admissions process. (Scare quotes are deliberate there.) Going into a four-day trip chaperoning the high Continue reading A little off topic today